1. gatehouse-editions:

First published in a series of extracts in 1938 as Two Englishwomen in Rome, the letters of Matilda Lucas and her sister Anne quickly found favour amongst lovers of the Eternal City and also became a source for scholars. Robert Sénécal has now transcribed and edited this complete correspondence, the originals of which are preserved in the Hitchin Museum. The letters with footnotes amount to a staggering 1,000 pages. Miss Lucas’s extracts are here put into their contexts and it is now possible to follow the exploits of these two indomitable women chronologically.

Miss Lucas first went to Rome accompanied by her sister Anne in 1871. Thereafter they wintered in the city annually until 1903. This was a period of immense change. Rome became the capital of the new Italian state in 1870 and morphed during the time of the sisters’ sojourn despite previously being the centre of the Roman Catholic Church, from something of a rural town into the metropolis which it is today. Huge tensions existed between the ousted papal regime and the new Italian monarchy. People took sides. All this is reflected in Miss Lucas’s correspondence.

Matilda and Anne Lucas were the daughters of the painter Samuel Lucas (1805–1870) of Hitchin in Hertfordshire. Of Quaker origin, they followed in their father’s footsteps in also having artistic interests. In Rome they studied drawing and painting under numerous artists and also decorated pottery which was sold in Rome, London and elsewhere.

These complete letters follow their development both artistic and personal. The two women quickly became a Roman institution. Not taking sides they had friends and acquaintances amongst followers of the new regime and the papal curia as well as the large ex-patriot community in the city. Thus they mixed with politicians, diplomats, monsignori, members of the aristocracy, both “black” and “white”, and befriended numerous artists such as Giuseppe Raggio, Onorato Carlandi and Ettore Roessler Franz, and many ex-patriot artists either living in or visiting the city.

In her original book Miss Lucas only dealt with the Roman part of her correspondence. However, the letters contain much to do with aspects of travel at the time and with visits to other parts of Italy on her journeys to and from Rome. Her travels also took her to places as far apart as Malta and Vienna.

——

"I’ve had so much enjoyment reading Miss Lucas’s letters…a wonderful job in bringing out the whole collection."Prof T.P. Wiseman, University of Exeter

"I keep meaning to congratulate further on your tremendous & patient achievement as editor…I sat up reading both volumes over three nights.  The cumulative effect is considerable.  Such detail: Victorian invalidism; social & snobbish revelations; insight into Roman society + Italian travel."

—-

Orders and further information at - info@gatehouseeditions.co.uk

“Every body comes back to Rome”
The Complete Letters Of Matilda Lucas, 1871 – 1902
Transcribed and Edited by Robert Sénécal
London, Gatehouse Editions, 2013
Casebound in 2 vols. £50.00 + p&p
ISBN: 978-0-9927342-0-6

    gatehouse-editions:

    First published in a series of extracts in 1938 as Two Englishwomen in Rome, the letters of Matilda Lucas and her sister Anne quickly found favour amongst lovers of the Eternal City and also became a source for scholars. Robert Sénécal has now transcribed and edited this complete correspondence, the originals of which are preserved in the Hitchin Museum. The letters with footnotes amount to a staggering 1,000 pages. Miss Lucas’s extracts are here put into their contexts and it is now possible to follow the exploits of these two indomitable women chronologically.

    Miss Lucas first went to Rome accompanied by her sister Anne in 1871. Thereafter they wintered in the city annually until 1903. This was a period of immense change. Rome became the capital of the new Italian state in 1870 and morphed during the time of the sisters’ sojourn despite previously being the centre of the Roman Catholic Church, from something of a rural town into the metropolis which it is today. Huge tensions existed between the ousted papal regime and the new Italian monarchy. People took sides. All this is reflected in Miss Lucas’s correspondence.

    Matilda and Anne Lucas were the daughters of the painter Samuel Lucas (1805–1870) of Hitchin in Hertfordshire. Of Quaker origin, they followed in their father’s footsteps in also having artistic interests. In Rome they studied drawing and painting under numerous artists and also decorated pottery which was sold in Rome, London and elsewhere.

    These complete letters follow their development both artistic and personal. The two women quickly became a Roman institution. Not taking sides they had friends and acquaintances amongst followers of the new regime and the papal curia as well as the large ex-patriot community in the city. Thus they mixed with politicians, diplomats, monsignori, members of the aristocracy, both “black” and “white”, and befriended numerous artists such as Giuseppe Raggio, Onorato Carlandi and Ettore Roessler Franz, and many ex-patriot artists either living in or visiting the city.

    In her original book Miss Lucas only dealt with the Roman part of her correspondence. However, the letters contain much to do with aspects of travel at the time and with visits to other parts of Italy on her journeys to and from Rome. Her travels also took her to places as far apart as Malta and Vienna.

    ——

    "I’ve had so much enjoyment reading Miss Lucas’s letters…a wonderful job in bringing out the whole collection."
    Prof T.P. Wiseman, University of Exeter

    "I keep meaning to congratulate further on your tremendous & patient achievement as editor…I sat up reading both volumes over three nights. The cumulative effect is considerable. Such detail: Victorian invalidism; social & snobbish revelations; insight into Roman society + Italian travel."

    —-

    Orders and further information at - info@gatehouseeditions.co.uk

    “Every body comes back to Rome”
    The Complete Letters Of Matilda Lucas, 1871 – 1902

    Transcribed and Edited by Robert Sénécal
    London, Gatehouse Editions, 2013
    Casebound in 2 vols. £50.00 + p&p
    ISBN: 978-0-9927342-0-6

  2. Production of a commissioned piece for a development in Bristol …

  3. Had a brief poke around the very intriguing Folkestone harbour earlier … some instagram posts

  4. Noble SentinelsA catalogue of my Bandstand Series to date.

    Noble Sentinels
    A catalogue of my Bandstand Series to date.

  5. Bal’lick TowerParallel views of this mythical tower are glimpsed from the gaps between buildings as a circular route is picked out through unknown streets. Based on Erno Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower & Balfron Tower in West and East London.

    Bal’lick Tower
    Parallel views of this mythical tower are glimpsed from the gaps between buildings as a circular route is picked out through unknown streets. Based on Erno Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower & Balfron Tower in West and East London.

  6. Fascinating time at a  photopolymer course at the London Print Studio today

    Fascinating time at a photopolymer course at the London Print Studio today

  7. Dusting off the screen printing technique (it’s been a while …)

    Dusting off the screen printing technique (it’s been a while …)

  8. Here are some sketch images from my new piece, The Bal’lick Tower, you can find a few more images and a bit of an introduction here on my main website. As with the Skylines this will be shown for the first time at my upcoming exhibition.
    NB the website is being redeveloped at the moment

  9. A bit more of a taste of my London skyline project, which can be seen in full at my upcomming exhibition - Visible City - more info at  visiblecityexhibition.tumblr.com

    A bit more of a taste of my London skyline project, which can be seen in full at my upcomming exhibition - Visible City - more info at visiblecityexhibition.tumblr.com

  10. I had a really enjoyable time the other evening giving a talk about a selection of my projects to the City of London & Cripplegate Photography Society, and they were kind enough to tweet this lovely message.

    I had a really enjoyable time the other evening giving a talk about a selection of my projects to the City of London & Cripplegate Photography Society, and they were kind enough to tweet this lovely message.

  11. Early tests of the london skyline project on the lightbox …

    Early tests of the london skyline project on the lightbox …

  12. Stumbled across these concrete block bollards on Charterhouse Street under the canopy of Smithfield Market … wonderfully enlivened! I’d love to know who did this …. a cracking idea well executed!

    Stumbled across these concrete block bollards on Charterhouse Street under the canopy of Smithfield Market … wonderfully enlivened! I’d love to know who did this …. a cracking idea well executed!

  13. I’m going to miss these odd walkway things … like something from the industrial zone in the Crystal Maze?! (at Platform 6)

    I’m going to miss these odd walkway things … like something from the industrial zone in the Crystal Maze?! (at Platform 6)

  14. A little stop frame video of my photo shoot with Jerrard Wayne Creatives on Friday. The results will be up on their site shortly - this was a little aside thought up that morning - surprising what you can do with a spare iPhone, some insulation tape and a coat stand!

  15. … He engages with the great lyricism created by the last profound European Art: the metaphysics of the most commonplace objects. Of those objects that habit has rendered so familiar to us that we often look at them with the eye of one who sees but does not understand.

    — Giorgio de Chirico on Giorgio Morandi, from the lovely exhibition at the Estorick Collection.